Krukowski Stone
   
Green Building Materials     U.S. Green Buildings Council     Green Eco-Friendly Building Materials
Krukowski Stone Co., Inc.

Long before “Green” building or LEED Certification was all the rage—making almost every headline in the building industry, Krukowski Stone Company began efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle. For decades Krukowski Stone Company has taken proactive efforts in the conservation of our valuable natural resources. Our vast efforts include minimizing waste, creating new products from remnant material and making smart choices throughout our entire manufacturing and quarry process. Furthermore, our quarry management includes a reclamation process to ensure final quarried land has restoration plans.

Natural stone is an everlasting building product and one of the oldest known to man. Buildings constructed with stone centuries ago are still in use today. Try to replace natural stone with an alternative building product, and you will be hard pressed to find a substitute with the same beauty, flexibility and permanence. Our natural stone has extraordinary durability there is no need for replacement due to product deterioration in any climate. Other than occasional cleaning, our natural stone products have virtually no maintenance.

PP 5Krukowski Stone Company’s natural stone thin veneers use up to 75% less stone than our full veneer products while maintaining the same natural surface appearance. All of our thin veneers weigh less than 15 pounds per square foot as required by Uniform Building Code of 1997. Thin veneers not only dramatically reduce waste but also significantly reduce installation, shipping and construction costs. We even offer economical thin veneer products which are created from small pieces of stone that in earlier years would have been wasted or unusable as an architectural stone product. The end result has exceptional value while supporting unmatched beauty for any project. Packaging for our thin veneer handy packs and crates are also environmentally friendly by being made from Polypropylene resin; a recyclable plastic.

Proximity of our two quarries in relationship to our manufacturing facility is less than one-half mile of each other. Our vehicles only need to travel a short distance to the production areas. In our Aqua quarry material that does not make block production can be fractured into useable boulders for architectural or landscaping purposes. In our sawing facility blocks which contain natural seams or fissures are sawn into slabs that are processed into sawn height architectural or landscaping materials and pavers. The cut-off or small unusable material is crushed into two sizes of landscape chips or path sand. Material that is unusable for the previous mentioned products are crushed into a state-specified road base. None of our stone is ever wasted or disposed of; all is used in a marketable product—not many companies’ can say that. Krukowski Stone Company maintains and manages a reclamation process to ensure quarried land has restoration plans for future generations.

Green Building MaterialsSeveral varieties of our products are as “green” as can be. They are removed from the natural layers in the quarry and palletized or loaded on to trucks for immediate use with no other manufacturing needed. These products include several types of architectural stone; such as Highland Brown Webwall, Chestnut Cobbles and Boulders, Aqua Blue Boulders and Wisconsin Granite Boulders and landscape stone such as Sandy Creek Flagstone and Steppers, Bear Mountain Flagstone and Steppers, Highland Brown and Chestnut Outcropping, Highland Brown and Chestnut Random Drywall, Highland Brown and Chestnut Random Steps, Chestnut Cobbles, Highland Brown Steppers, Carmel Cream Boulders, Gettysburg and Arcadia Outcropping. These items are indicated throughout the binder with our “Green Building Materials” logo shown at right.

Green Eco-Friendly Building Materials

Several new and popular products have been created from otherwise excess materials: Glacier Bay Irregular tumbled pavers, Prairie House, WI Granite boulder cut-offs, Rip Rap, Aqua landscape chips, road base. These items are indicated throughout the binder with our “Eco Friendly Building Materials” logo shown at right.

A large contribution to being green friendly was an investment in our sawing facility with the purchase and installation of a water treatment system. All of the water used in all areas of production is recycled by a closed loop system. The sediment is separated and solids are reclaimed and used for construction fill or quarry reclamation. The water is used during sawing because it aids greatly in dust reduction, acts as a lubricant and keeps the blades cool during the sawing process and extends the life of the diamonds used in cutting.

New Shot Blast Texture

This process was devised to create a surface texture that did not use fossil fuels in the production. This new texture is processed on a second-hand Wheelabrator machine, which we purchased and then refurbished. We use small stainless steel shot that is propelled onto the surface of the stone which erodes areas of the stone, giving a dull matte finish and slip resistant texture. The stainless steel shot is recycled again and again and will last for years.

Reduce, Reuse and Recycle... Little Things Mean a Lot

  • All used office paper, envelopes, junk mail, etc... is shredded for on site recycling. The shredded paper is blended with molding plaster for added strength which is used to hold stone blocks in place during the sawing process.
  • All cardboard is cut into small squares on site and used as corner protectors between the stone and the steel band on all of our banded material.
  • We purchase used pallets that are repaired on site for use in our packaging department.
  • We program our large saws to run in the overnight hours in order to use electricity in the off-peak hours.
  • All used oil is recycled.
  • Scrap iron is sold to a recycling facility.
  • Equipment batteries are sent to a recycling center.
  • All leftover stone pieces that do not meet standards are used as shoreline rip-rap or crushed into a state specified road base.

Definitions

Green Building or Sustainable Building is an outcome of a design which focuses on increasing the efficiency of resource use—energy, water, and materials—while reducing building impacts on human health and the environment during the building's lifecycle, through better siting, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and removal.

LEED USGBC

LEED = Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

Green Building Rating SystemTM encourages and accelerates global adoption of sustainable green building and development practices through the creation and implementation of universally understood and accepted tools and performance criteria.

500 Mile Radius Map

LEED Certification Points are based on the overall building design concept and performance.
MR Credit 5.1: Regional Materials 10% Extracted, Process & Manufactured Regionally, 1 Point
MR Credit 5.2: Regional Materials 20% Extracted, Process & Manufactured Regionally, 1 Point in Addition to MR Credit 5.1

(See description below)

500 radius map

LEED Information

How does the LEED Rating System include stone products?

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™, developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, encourages and accelerates global adoption of sustainable green building and development practices through the creation and implementation of universally understood and accepted tools and performance criteria. First developed in 1998, LEED is a third-party certification program and the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality.

Who uses LEED?

Architects, engineers, interior designers, landscape architects, real estate professionals, construction managers, facility managers, lenders and government officials all use LEED. State and local governments across the country are adopting LEED for publicly-owned and publicly-funded buildings; there are LEED initiatives in federal agencies, including the Department of Defense, Agriculture, Energy, and State; and LEED projects are in progress in 41 different countries, including Canada, Brazil, Mexico and India.

How is LEED developed?

LEED Rating Systems are developed through and open, consensus-based process led by LEED committees. Each volunteer committee is composed of a diverse group of practitioners and experts representing a cross-section of the building and construction industry. The key elements of USGBC’s consensus process include a balanced and transparent committee structure, technical advisory groups that ensure scientific consistency and rigor, opportunities for stakeholder comment and review, member ballot of new rating systems, and a fair and open appeals process.

What types of projects are affected by LEED?

There are LEED rating systems for:

  • New Construction and Major Renovations
  • Existing Buildings, Operations and Maintenance
  • Commercial Interiors
  • Core and Shell
  • Schools
  • Homes
  • Retail
  • Healthcare
  • Neighborhood Development

Basic LEED Nomenclature

  • BUILDINGS can be LEED CERTIFIED
  • PEOPLE can become LEED ACCREDITED PROFESSIONALS (APs)
  • Products can contribute to or comply with the LEED Certification of a Project
  • Products cannot be LEED Certified or Accredited
  • People cannot be LEED Certified
  • It’s LEED, not “LEEDS”

How does the LEED Rating System include stone products?

Stone products can contribute to or comply with the LEED certification of a project based on four criteria/credits within in the 2009 version of the LEED for New Construction version 2.2 Rating System:

  • Credit 4.1: Recycled Content, 10% (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer)
  • Credit 4.2: Recycled Content, 20% (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer)
  • Credit 5.1: Regional Materials, 10% extracted, processed and manufactured regionally
  • Credit 5.2: Regional Materials, 20% extracted, processed and manufactured regionally

To further explain credits 4.1 and 4.2: If it is communicated that a flooring installation product contains 10% recycled content, the 10% must come from post-consumer and/or preconsumer waste. If the recycled content is from pre-consumer waste, only half the amount of recycled content counts toward the 10% calculated by the LEED rating system.

For more information, please visit this website: www.usgbc.org/leed.

Source: U.S. Green Building Council

LEED for New Construction Rating System v2.2

MR Credit 4.1:
Recycled Content: 10% (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer)
1 Point

Intent

Increase demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, thereby reducing impacts resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials.

Requirements

Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes at least 10% (based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project.

The recycled content value of a material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the cost of assembly to determine the recycled content value.

Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators shall not be included in this calculation. Only include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included, providing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3-7.

Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document, ISO 14021 – Environmental labels and declarations – Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling).

Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial and instituitional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer by used for its intended purpose.

Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.

Potential Technologies & Strategies

Establish a project goal for recycled content materials and identify material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified recycled content materials are installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.

MR Credit 4.2:
Recycled Content: 20% (post-consumer + ½ pre-consumer)
1 Point in addition to MR Credit 4.1

Intent

Increase demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, thereby reducing impacts resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials.

Requirements

Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes at an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 4.1 (total of 20%, based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project.

The recycled content value of a material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the cost of assembly to determine the recycled content value.

Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators shall not be included in this calculation. Only include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included, providing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3-7.

Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document, ISO 14021 – Environmental labels and declarations – Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling).

Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial and instituitional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer by used for its intended purpose.

Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.

Potential Technologies & Strategies

Establish a project goal for recycled content materials and identify material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified recycled content materials are installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.

MR CREDIT 5.1:
Regional Materials: 10% Extracted, Processes & Manufactured Regionally
1 Point

Intent

Increase demand for building materials and products that are extracted and manufactured within the region, thereby supporting the use of indigenous resources and reducing the environmental impacts resulting from transportation.

Requirements

Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for a minimum of 10% (based on cost) of the total materials value. If only a fraction of a product or material is extracted/ harvested/recovered and manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.

Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators and equipment shall not be included in this calculation. Only include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included, providing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3-7.

Potential Technologies & Strategies

Establish a project goal for locally sourced materials, and identify materials and material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified local materials are installed and quantify the total percentage of local materials installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.

MR CREDIT 5.2:
Regional Materials: 20% Extracted, Processes & Manufactured Regionally
1 Point in addition to MR Credit 5.1

Intent

Increase demand for building materials and products that are extracted and manufactured within the region, thereby supporting the use of indigenous resources and reducing the environmental impacts resulting from transportation.

Requirements

Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 5.1 (total of 20%, based on cost) of the total materials value. If only a fraction of a product or material is extracted/harvested/recovered and manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.

Potential Technologies & Strategies

Establish a project goal for locally sourced materials, and identify materials and material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified local materials are installed and quantify the total percentage of local materials installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.

Information provided by the U.S. Green Building Council